2017 Domaine du Clos de Tart Clos de Tart Grand Cru (Pre-Arrival)

SKU #1433585 96-98 points Vinous

 The 2017 Clos de Tart Grand Cru was matured in around 80% new oak, the barrels toasted chauff blonde. Jacques Desvauges mentioned that the wine needed oxygen ingress during maturation that only new oak can give. I tasted the component parts (as usual) as well as the blend. This has a very detailed, delineated bouquet offering mainly black fruit mixed with sous-bois, tobacco, clove and bay leaf, the typicité of the appellation showing through nicely. It feels very succinct and yet so fresh. The palate is beautifully balanced on the entry with a killer line of acidity. Pure black cherry fruit is joined by bilberry, hints of black olive and a marine/oyster shell tincture that comes through quite strongly toward the persistent, saline finish, which fans out with confidence. This is a brilliant follow-up to the benchmark 2016 by Jacques Desvauges and his team.(NM)  (1/2019)

96 points Decanter

 Despite what has been written about high yields in the Côte de Nuits in 2017, Jacques de Vauges made less Clos de Tart than he did in 2016. Picked much earlier than it used to be when Sylvain Pitiot was in charge, this is a fine, focussed, nuanced wine that expresses the complexity of this monopole grand cru. With deftly integrated 60% whole bunches and 80% new wood, it's elegant, floral and precise with chalky freshness. Drinking Window 2023 - 2032.(TA)  (10/2018)

93-95 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

 The 2017 Clos de Tart Grand Cru is a decided success, wafting from the glass with fragrant aromas of orange rind, raspberries, wild berries and peonies that are complemented by deeper-pitched nuances of grilled game, cinnamon and spicy soil tones. On the palate, the wine is full-bodied, satiny and succulent, with an open, giving profile this year despite its excellent concentration and fleshy core, concluding with a tangy, saline finish. Tasting several barrels of the different components, which had been held back when the assemblage was made, was in a sense more revealing than trying the final blend, since the latter had been racked and sulfited. Once again, Jacques Desvauges used appreciable percentages of whole cluster and matured the wine in 80% new oak.(WK)  (1/2019)

91-94 points Allen Meadows - Burghound

 A much more floral-inflected nose is equally fresh and ripe with a broader range of spice elements adding breadth to the pretty red and blue pinot fruit aromas. The caressing and wonderfully vibrant medium-bodied flavors possess notably better mid-palate density before concluding in a lingering, balanced and much more complex finale. I like the focused and drive of the finish, indeed this could aptly be described as a wine that delivers power without weight.  (1/2019)

K&L Notes

94-98pts Jasper Morris Inside Burgundy: "80% new wood, mostly from François Frères and Taransaud. The blend of the various different cuvées seems if anything to be the deepest in colour, with pure refreshing red fruit, mostly raspberry in style but it is a mix of all the little red fruits. The whole bunch component, which varies according to each plot, has been tamed. There is a wonderful burst of rich velvet coated red fruit with a lovely crisp and crunchy tingle at the back. Fine tannins, good acidity, very much in balance. Tasted: November 2018."


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Price: $619.99
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Varietal:

Pinot Noir

- One of France's most legendary grapes and the grape that earned Burgundy its reputation. The parent of varietals like Pinot Gris/Grigio and Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir is blue to violet to indigo in color with relatively thin skins, and it is said to have been cultivated in France for more than 2,000 years. At its best, Pinot Noir creates elegant wines that are filled with primary red fruit aromas and flavors while young, revealing with an array of secondary characteristics like earth, smoke, violet, truffle and game with age. The varietal is also known, perhaps better than any, for its ability to translate terroir, or a sense of place. While the best Pinot Noir still comes from Burgundy, it is being produced with increasing success in cooler climates around the world. In France, it is part of the trifecta of grapes that can go into Champagne, and it is also grown in Alsace, Irancy, Jura, Savoie, Lorraine and Sancerre. Outside of France it is produced under the names Pinot Nero and Blauburgunder in Italy's mountainous regions, as Spätburgunder in Germany and as Blauburgunder in Austria. In the US, Pinot Noir has found suitable growing conditions in the cooler parts of California, including Carneros, the Russian River Valley, the Anderson Valley, the Sonoma Coast, Monterey County, the Santa Lucia Highlands and Santa Barbara County, as well as in Oregon's Willamette Valley. In recent years, New Zealand has demonstrated its ability to interpret this hard-to-grow varietal, with successful bottlings coming from careful and attentive growers in Central Otago, Martinborough and Canterbury. Chile is also an up-and-coming region for Pinot Noir, creating fresh, fruit-forward, early-drinking and affordable Pinots from the coastal Casablanca Valley and the Limari Valley.
Country:

France

- When it comes to wine, France stands alone. No other country can beat it in terms of quality and diversity. And while many of its Region, Bordeaux, Burgundy and Champagne most obviously, produce wine as rare, as sought-after and nearly as expensive as gold, there are just as many obscurities and values to be had from little known appellations throughout the country. To learn everything there is to know about French wine would take a lifetime. To understand and appreciate French wine, one only has to begin tasting them.
Sub-Region:

Burgundy

- The province of eastern France, famous for its red wines produced from Pinot Noir and its whites produced from Chardonnay. (Small of amounts of Gamay and Aligoté are still grown, although these have to be labeled differently.) The most famous part of the region is known as the Côte d'Or (the Golden Slope). It is divided into the Côte de Beaune, south of the town of Beaune (famous principally for its whites), and the Côte de Nuits, North of Beaune (home of the most famous reds). In addition, the Côte Chalonnaise and the Mâconnais are important wine growing regions, although historically a clear level (or more) below the Côte d'Or. Also include by some are the regions of Chablis and Auxerrois, farther north.
Alcohol Content (%): 13.6